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Poster: robthewordsmith Date: Feb 10, 2011 11:32am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Tense times in Tahir Square

A statement issued by the Egyptian military a short time ago:

"Based on the responsibility of the Armed Forces, and its commitment to protect the people, and to oversee their interests and security, and with a view to the safety of the nation and the citizenry, and of the achievements and properties of the great people of Egypt, and in affirmation and support for the legitimate demands of the people, the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces convened today, 10 February 2011, to consider developments to date, and decided to remain in continuous session to consider what procedures and measures that may be taken to protect the nation, and the achievements and aspirations of the great people of Egypt."

There's stink of military takeover in the air. I sincerely hope I'm wrong.

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Feb 10, 2011 11:52am
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Tense times in Tahir Square

If you look at Omar Suleiman's career, one doesn't get the sense of a bold reformer. It would be like, for many in my country, replacing GWB w/ Dick Cheney. The House of Saud, which has close ties with the ruling elite in Egypt, has already stated that they will replace any foreign aid lost due to sanctions. It effectively kneecaps our (the West's) leverage. It's carnival time now as the army has it's way. Or the jihadists. Or the people in a mass uprising.
I wouldn't make any travel plans to go see the Pyramids anytime soon.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 10, 2011 12:16pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Tense times in Tahir Square


Apologies for being 20 years out of date... (?)

What has happened is that in the last 20 years, America has changed from a producer to a consumer. And all consumers know that when the producer names the tune...the consumer has got to dance. That's the way it is. We used to be a producer � very inflexible at that, and now we are consumers and, finding it difficult to understand. Natural resources and minerals will change your world. The Arabs used to be in the 3rd World. They have bought the 2nd World and put a firm down payment on the 1st one. Controlling your resources will control your world. This country has been surprised by the way the world looks now. They don't know if they want to be Matt Dillon or Bob Dylan. They don't know if they want to be diplomats or continue the same policy - of nuclear nightmare diplomacy. John Foster Dulles ain't nothing but the name of an airport now.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=56ipWM3DWe4

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Poster: srtg83 Date: Feb 10, 2011 7:52pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Tense times in Tahir Square

I am not sure that I like the producer/consumer analysis. I am a Realist when it comes to these geopolitical matters. This is still just the fallout from the collapse of the Warsaw Pact. The Arabs were left unprotected when the Soviet influence disappeared in the Middle-East with the Americans pushing in to clear the void. History may still be kind to the Bushes when this is all done. The democratic aspiration of the people is also understandable resulting from the potent mix of tremendous wealth, increased higher education, corruption and severe poverty. Throw in a good dose of technology to bring it all together and here we are with Egypt ready to explode. Here is a good summation of events thus far:

"The protests that have shaken the Egyptian political system and the political landscape of the Middle East were partly inspired by the example of Tunisia, where street protesters toppled the president on January 14. Eight weeks ago to the day on Friday, a young man in the provincial city of Sidi Bouzid set himself alight on the main square in protest after police confiscated the vegetable cart with which he was trying to scrape a living. The wave of anger which Mohamed Bouazizi set in motion across the Arab world has drawn comparisons with the toppling of communist leaders in eastern Europe in 1989. Governments from Morocco to Yemen have made concessions to people unhappy with rising prices and unemployment and a lack of political freedoms."


This post was modified by srtg83 on 2011-02-11 03:52:26

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Feb 10, 2011 8:22pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Tense times in Tahir Square

Who is the quote from?
I kinda, sorta agree with your analysis. Not enough daylight to make a stink. Regardless of what one thought at the time, I think to discount a shaky, but working democracy in Iraq does not lead to a realistic portrait of the Arab world.
The most serious uprising, of the many that have happened in the last year, was last June in Iran. We really had an opportunity there to help effect change. Now, they are still executing protesters, or the renamed, enemy of the state and Allah.
Graphic video,
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DmgZYtkpiYo&;feature=related

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Poster: jerlouvis Date: Feb 10, 2011 1:10pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Tense times in Tahir Square

Thanks for the Gil Scott Heron link,I forgot how good that piece was and really enjoyed hearing it again.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 10, 2011 1:44pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Tense times in Tahir Square

Yea, I then hit the Gil mix on youtube and have been playing since (some real good Nina Simone at the moment). I love me some Gil

The pics of Muslims protecting Coptic Christians so they could pay and Christians protecting Muslims while they prayed will hopefully remain the lasting images from Tahir Square. Each one reach one, each one teach one... Children of Abraham and all that jazz...

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Poster: Mandojammer Date: Feb 10, 2011 4:05pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Tense times in Tahir Square

bd -

Nice win last night....

May I suggest you read "Twilight In The Desert" by Matt Simmons?

We have known for years the Saudis and everyone else with oil reserves has overstated their levels. Hell, 90% of of the world's oil producing nations have unaudited reserve levels so the recent Wikilieaks cables may understate the problems for the Saudis.

Once the easy oil is gone from the Saudi fields they will become a 4th world country. The West (read US) will become 2nd tier 1st world. The difference is out fall will be catastrophic.

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Poster: bluedevil Date: Feb 10, 2011 4:19pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Tense times in Tahir Square

Thanks. Always up for more insight and good reads. I should go back and re-read Daniel Yergin's "The Prize" - or at least the most recent updated sections.

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Poster: micah6vs8 Date: Feb 10, 2011 12:47pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Re: Tense times in Tahir Square

Gil reminds me of Spalding Grey(RIP), except more macho and funky.

> And all consumers know that when the producer names the tune...the consumer has got to dance. That's the way it is. We used to be a producer...

Isn't that sadly our lot. I hope crude prices don't spike.

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Poster: dark.starz Date: Feb 10, 2011 1:07pm
Forum: GratefulDead Subject: Mubarak Rhetoric

Rhetoric is the art and study of the use of language with persuasive effect.